Health Tips For Busy People – Fall 2008


REPRINT Health Tips For Busy People – Fall 2008

The content of this brief is prepared in accordance with the highest standards of journalistic accuracy. Readers are cautioned, however, not to use brief information as a substitute for regular professional health care.

LIVING WITH DIABETES

Healthy Lifestyle Changes- like eating right and getting lots of exercise – can help people with diabetes stay in the fast lane.

There are 24 Million Americans with Diabetes, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). That’s three million more than just three years ago.

A quarter of the people with this life-threatening disease are unaware they have it.

Another 57 million people have elevated blood sugar, a condition called prediabetes that puts them at risk of developing the full-blown disease. If left untreated, high or erratic blood sugar levels can develop into problems from kidney disease to blindness to cardiovascular disease.

There are a variety of effective medical treatments to help control blood sugar. Your doctor will know all of the details. You can help too, with lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise.

Being active and eating right can go a long way toward preventing diabetes or delaying its progression.

Healthful eating starts at the market. What you choose to put into your cart, and later into your mouth, can either work for or against your body. Skip the high-glycemic “white foods” (potatoes, white bread, rice) which quickly break down into blood sugar.

Load up instead on high-fiber whole grains and vitamin C-rich fruits and vegetables, like broccoli and oranges (one recent study recently found that people with high levels of vitamin C had a lower incidence of diabetes).

Make sure you get your daily dose of exercise, which can help control blood sugar because you burn more when you’re active. Working out also builds muscle mass. Active muscles do a better job of absorbing sugar than sedentary muscles. Walking daily is overall healthy.

There are 24 Million Americans with Diabetes, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). That’s three million more than just three years ago.

American Diabetes Association (ADA)

http://www.diabetes.org/about-diabetes.jsp

The non-profit ADA offers a site full of helpful information and tools.

You’ll find self-tests on risks, along with the latest on diagnosis, treatments, nutrition and exercise.

Check out the MyFoodAdvisor calorie and carbohydrate counting tool and the

Nutrition & Recipes Guides to food labels and eating out.

Joslin Diabetes Center

http://www.joslin.org

Just diagnosed with diabetes? This helpful web site from Harvard Medical School’s Joslin Diabetes Center offer a comprehensive beginner’s guide to understanding diabetes and all of its health repercussions, a glossary and an extensive library of articles that tackles every aspect of the disease and its prevention and treatment.

The All-Natural Diabetes Cookbook by Jackie Newgent, RD, American Diabetes Association, 2007, $12.89 (paperback)

Dietitian Jackie Newgent shows how to use sneaky fat- and cholesterol-cutting tricks to keep foods tasty and healthful. Her flavorful recipes will be a breath of fresh air to diners with diabetes who are tired of bland meals. Includes tips and trivia to make sticking to a healthy diet fun.

BREATHING EASIER

More than 20 Million Americans suffer from Asthma.

According to a recent study from the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA), many of them aren’t doing such a great job of controlling it. Asthma, a chronic inflammatory disease, can be a very serious problem, sending nearly two million people to the emergency room each year and it is a fatal condition for 11 people each day. The winter months, when air is particularly dry or with a sudden change of temperature, may cause more problems for some asthma sufferers.

During an asthma attack, the lining of the airways in the lungs becomes inflamed and swollen, and more mucus is produced. As air passages narrow, breathing becomes much more difficult. Other symptoms include wheezing, chest tightness, coughing and rapid breathing. To avoid such attacks and maintain lung function and health, most people with asthma take a double treatment approach, using both maintenance and rescue medication. Maintenance, or control, medications aim to decrease inflammation in the lungs, reduce phlegm production, relax muscle airways and prevent airways from swelling. Fast-acting rescue therapy is used for occasional quick relief of chest tightness, coughing or wheezing. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program’s guidelines state, asthma patients should ideally use a rescue inhaler no more than twice a week. The AAFA study found, however, that some patients were turning to recue therapy as often as once a day.

To better control asthma attacks, experts recommend that sufferers adjust their maintenance medication and learn to better avoid their personal asthma trigger. Such triggers vary from person to person and include respiratory infections or reaction to airborne irritants such as pollen, molds, animal dander, feathers, dust or cigarette smoke. To test Your Asthma IQ, <a=href>Click This <Link></a>.

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA)

http://www.aafa.org

The web site of the AAFA offers a multimedia asthma library of symptoms, treatments and news on video. There’s also an “Ask the Allergist” tool, a glossary of asthma terms and prevention advice.

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/

Visit the web site of the NHLBI for a comprehensive look at asthma prevention and treatment including how to live well with the disease.

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) http://www.aaaai.org/patients.stm

Visit the AAAAI website for pollen and mold counts in your area and news on the latest asthma research.

American Lung Association (ALA)

http://www.lungusa.org

Peruse asthma treatment options, news and procedures at this helpful site.

TEST YOUR ASTHMA IQ

Is it Allergies or Asthma?

Are You Using Your Inhaler Too Much? Find Out Here.

I HAVE ASTHMA BUT IT’S REALLY JUST A BAD CASE OF ALLERGIES. False

It’s true that allergies may trigger asthma attacks (as many as 60 percent of attacks may be caused by sensitivity to allergens, according to research by the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology), but allergies are entirely exposure related. Take away the dog hair or the pollen and an allergy sufferer feels better quite quickly and regains full lung function.

For people with asthma, airways may stay super-sensitive or inflamed even in the absence of environmental irritants.

To diagnose asthma, your doctor will give you a breathing test using a tool that you breathe into called a spirometer. The test measures how much air you can blow out of your lungs after taking a deep breath and how fast you can do it. The results will be lower than normal if your airways are inflamed and narrowed, or if the muscles around your airways have tightened up.

RESCUE INHALERS ARE OKAY TO USE DAILY. False

Using a rescue inhaler too frequently may be a sign that your asthma is out of control, experts say. Such medications may stop symptoms but aren’t treating the root cause, which is inflammation. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program’s guidelines recommend that asthma patients use a rescue inhaler no more than twice a week. Instead they recommend that people with asthma control it with maintenance medications that are designed to prevent attacks in the first place. Prevention therapies include oral and inhaled corticosteroids that decrease lung inflammation; long-acting beta-agonists, which relax muscles around the airways; and luekotriene-modifying agents that also decrease inflammation in certain airways. Often a combination of prevention, or control, treatments is prescribed along with a rescue inhaler.

EXERCISE AND OTHER FACTORS CAN OFTEN TRIGGER ASTHMA. True.

Strenuous physical exercise can trigger attacks, especially if you’re breathing through your mouth for long periods in cold, dry air. Changing weather conditions, such as a drop in barometric pressure, can also trigger an episode. So can exposure to strong odors or sprays such as perfumes, household cleaners, hair spray, cooking fumes, (especially from frying) and paints or varnishes.

Viral infections, such as colds, sinusitis or pneumonia can also trigger or activate asthma. They irritate already sensitive airways and send them into spasm.

Even such seemingly unrelated problems like gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a condition in which stomach acid flows back up the esophagus, can trigger asthma symptoms. People with asthma should also be aware that some medications, including aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) such as Ibuprofen, and beta-blockers (used to treat heart disease, high blood pressure, migraine headaches or glaucoma), may aggravate their symptoms.

The Allergy and Asthma Cure:

A Complete 8-Step Nutritional Program, by Fred Pescatore, MD, Wiley, 2006, $10.85 (U.S.) (paperback)

Can nutritional fixes help ease allergies and asthma?

Author-doctor Fred Pescatore thinks so. His book examines the underlying causes of allergies and asthma, from food to the environment. He lays out a plan that uses alternative and traditional medicine and treatments to relieve asthma symptoms.

The Asthma Sourcebook, by Frances V. Adams, MD, McGraw-Hill, 2006, $13.56 (paperback)

Perfect for new asthma sufferers or those who want to review the basics of what causes asthma, how it is diagnosed and treated and the best ways to manage the disease. Also offers anatomical diagrams, resources and a glossary of terms.

A GOOD NIGHT’S SLEEP

Can’t get to sleep? Can’t STAY asleep?

Welcome to the club.

Sleep problems plague nearly 60 percent of the population, although many people haven’t been properly diagnosed.

Not getting enough sleep (most people need about seven and a half hours each night) can cause health problems. Your memory does take a hit, your skin doesn’t get the repair time it needs and even your weight can be affected. In fact, not getting enough rest dramatically increases your risk of being obese, experts say. And some studies have shown that sleep deprivation is also linked to diabetes, depression, high blood pressure and even higher mortality rates.

Insomnia is typically categorized as long-term (chronic) or short-term (acute). You may suffer from acute insomnia if you have a new baby who won’t sleep, are suffering from jet lag or worrying about a lost job. Chronic sleep problems tend to last a month or longer and may be the result of a sleep disorder such as apnea (interrupted breathing during sleep) or restless leg syndrome, a neurological disorder that makes your legs twitch.

It is smart to consult a doctor about your problems. Treatments range from medication to biofeedback (to teach relaxation) to creating an environment that is conducive to encouraging sleep onset (see “Smarter Ways to Sleep Better” <link>)

If you tend to wake up in the middle of the night and have trouble getting back to sleep, you may have sleep maintenance insomnia. For many people, worrying about getting back to sleep is a stimulant that keeps them up even longer! Experts suggest keeping the lights low and reading a book for a few minutes, then trying to sleep again. If the problem persists, your doctor may recommend a sleep aid.

Smart ways to Sleep Better

  • Make your bedroom a stress-free, sleep-only zone.

    Don’t take the Sunday Paper, Larry King Live or your last-minute work to bed with you.

  • Keep your sleeping quarters cool and dark.

    Too hot and you’ll toss and turn, too light and your internal alarm clock may think it is time to get up.

  • A caffeine-free drink, like herbal tea, may help you drift off. Alcohol, on the other hand, may help you fall asleep but can have a rebound effect that wakes you up a few hours later.
  • A warm bath? Aromatherapy? There’s not a lot of science that says they’re sleep inducing, but they probably won’t do any harm.

National Sleep Foundation (NSF)

http://www.sleepfoundation.org

Teaching the life-and-death importance of a good night’s sleep is the goal of the NSF site, which has interactive tools, quizzes and information for those in search of sleep.

Learn the importance of sleep hygiene and how to determine whether you have a sleep disorder. An “Ask the Sleep Expert” section offers advice on such topics as insomnia, pain and sleep and depression.

American Sleep Association (ASA)

http://www.sleepassociation.org

The web site of this association of physicians and scientists provides basic information on sleep and sleep disorders, from insomnia to apnea and restless leg syndrome. Users can search for medical research and abstracts on sleep topics and find a sleep lab near them.

The Harvard Medical School Guide to a Good Night’s Sleep, by Lawrence Epstein, MD, McGraw-Hill, 2006, $10.85 (paperback)

Lawrence Epstein, a doctor and sleep expert at Harvard Medical School, offers a six-step program for overcoming sleep problems, from insomnia and snoring to restless leg syndrome and sleep apnea. Also covers how to turn your bedroom into a sleep-friendly environment and decide which sleep medication might be right for you.

Insomniac, by Gail Greene, University of California Press, 2008, $19.77 U.S.

Written by a chronic (and often cranky) insomniac, this book explores the causes of, and supposed cures for, insomnia, explores the latest science on sleep and discusses the many repercussions of sleep deprivation, from lowered creativity and sex drive to weight gain and memory loss.

EAT RIGHT FOR LIFE

A Balanced Diet can help you live a long healthy life, do you know the food plan that is right for you?

REMEMBER THE OLD FOOD PYRAMID?

For those with Short-Term Memory loss, or the young people in our readership, it actually used to be a pyramid; with the foods you were supposed to eat more of on the bottom and the ones to eat sparingly on the top.

Different people have different dietary needs. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) introduced new guidelines in 2005, to be updated in 2010. No longer one-size-fits-all, the new “pyramid” lets you figure out the best diet for you, whether dieting to lose pounds at 30 or making certain to meet Recommended Daily Allowances for vitamins at beyond 50.

To be healthy at all ages, limit portion sizes and prevent overeating- making sure every calorie counts, it’s not just about counting calories. Quality definitely outclasses quantity in determining BALANCE. Remember that you are not balancing a scale which weighs the quality of your life (by weighing yourself) You are balancing your engine, your diet is your harmonic balancer by which you determine the quality of your life, tipping the scales in your favor.

The key is to eat nutrient-dense foods that satisfy adult recommendations for calcium, potassium, fiber, magnesium and vitamins A (as carotenoids), C and E.

That means loading up on fresh, colorful fruits and vegetables, which are full of fiber and natural phytochemicals that have anticancer properties. It means eating more whole rains that are packed with fiber, protein, vitamins and minerals. In fact, the new dietary guidelines recommend three servings of whole grains per day to help lower cholesterol and lower the risk of heart disease and type-2 diabetes. Beans are another way to get your fiber along with magnesium, potassium, and folate.

An important part of a healthful diet is watching the fat content of what you eat. Even if you over-do artery-clogging saturated fats only occasionally, research shows you could still be in trouble. After eating just one meal high in saturated fats, study participants’ good cholesterol was less able to fight the buildup of fatty plaques, which can lead to heart disease.

Choose eating fats from nuts, avocados and cold-water fish and skip full-fat dairy, red meat and fried foods; or anything with hydrogenated oil.

Cranberries not only help to fight off urinary tract infections, they may reduce stomach ills and fight gum disease. Blueberries protect your memory, and again protect from UTI’s. Tomatoes are a source of valuable lycopene, an anti-oxidant. It just might be true after all that “An apple a day keeps the doctor away”, apples are now thought to keep cholesterol in-check. The foods that are best for you are often the freshest and tastiest too! Eating right for life is a way of being nice to you first, yes you are that important!!

USDA MyPyramid

http://www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/grains_tips.html

Go inside the food pyramid at this site from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) for helpful advice on how to determine healthy portion sizes and work them into your daily diet. Its interactive MyPyramid Tracker can help you choose the foods and amounts that are right for you. You’ll get advice on smart choices from every food group, how to balance food intake and physical activity and get the most nutrition out of your calories.

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/

Download the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2005, at this government site to get helpful information on deciphering food labels and choosing the most nutritious foods when you’re eating in or out. “Healthier You” information on the site helps you determine your Body Mass Index (BMI) and how many calories you need each day to maintain a healthy weight. A section of diets and worksheets helps you put your good intentions into action.

Medline Plus

http://nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus

Find information about eating right and healthy living in the medical encyclopedia section of this web site created by the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health. It provides helpful and easy-to-understand illustrated explanations of various heart-health ailments and how to combat them with lifestyle changes, including exercise, diet and medication.

MyRecipes.com/recipes/

http://www.myrecipes.com/recipes/

Looking for smart ways to eat healthy? This web site from Cooking Light, Southern Living and Health magazines is full of flavorful recipes.

The Nutrition Source

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource

This nutrition site run by the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health explores the latest science about healthful eating for adults. It offers clear tips for a healthy diet and dispels a few nutrition myths along the way. You’ll find out what you should eat from protein, fiber, fats and carbohydrates to fruits and vegetables – and why.

HOW HEALTHY ARE YOU?

Are You as fit on the I

‘YOU HAVE HIGH TRIGLYCERIDES.’

That news can be quite a shocker, particularly if you have been trying to take good care of yourself by eating right and exercising regularly. The problem is, what’s happening on the outside doesn’t always reflect the inside. That’s why knowing your cholesterol and triglyceride levels is important. Those numbers measure the various fats in your bloodstream and can give you important clues as to how healthy you really are, and what steps you should take to become even healthier.

Many people are familiar with HDL and LDL cholesterol and even know their own levels (for most, the goal is for HDL to be above 60 and LDL to be under 100). HDL is called good cholesterol because it helps to get rid of bad cholesterol (LDL), which can cause a buildup of plaque in your arteries, putting you at major risk for heart disease, hardening of the arteries and stroke.

Unlike cholesterol, there really isn’t a bright side to triglycerides. When you take in too many calories (it doesn’t matter if they’re from pizza, Krispy-Kremes, salmon or broccoli, the extras are turned into triglycerides and stored in your fat cells. Build up too many fat cells and you could be at risk for diabetes, kidney disease or metabolic syndrome, which is a combination of high blood pressure, high blood sugar, too much fat around the waistline, low HDL (good) cholesterol and high triglycerides. The syndromes raises your chances of heart disease, diabetes and stroke.

To measure your cholesterol and triglyceride levels, you’ll need to do a fasting blood test, called a lipoprotein panel, or triad. Although tested at the same time, triglycerids are measured on a different scale from cholesterol (see ‘The Numbers Game’ <link>).

If the numbers are high? The happy news is that there are medications that can lower your numbers to better levels. Your doctor may also prescribe a diet-and-exercise regimen that focuses on calories-in/calories-out, so that you’ll have fewer leftover calories holding a dangerous fat-cell convention right around your midsection.

The Numbers Game

Do you know your triglyceride levels?

The Next time you get your cholesterol checked,

Review these numbers to compare.

NORMAL – Less than 150 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

BORDERLINE HIGH – 150 to 199 (mg/dL)

HIGH – 200 to 499 (mg/dL)

VERY HIGH – 500 (mg/dL) or above

Source: American Heart Association

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource

This nutrition site run by the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health explores the latest science about healthful eating for adults. It offers clear tips for a healthy diet and dispels a few nutrition myths along the way. You’ll find out what you should eat from protein, fiber, fats and carbohydrates to fruits and vegetables – and why.

American Heart Association (AHA)

7272 Greenville Avenue

Dallas, TX 75231

(800) 242-8721

http://www.americanheart.org

The AHA offers print and online materials to help consumers reduce their risks of cardiovascular disease and stroke. Its web site offers advice on making nutritious food choices. A section of triglycerides explains lipid levels and how to lower them with diet, exercise, or medication.

Web MD

http://www.webmd.com

The Heart Health Center of this doctor-driven web site provides the latest headlines in heart health and blood pressure news as well as comprehensive explanations of how the heart works and information on how cholesterol and triglyceride levels impact heart health. With a glossary of terms and resource and community links.

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

http://www.nhlbi.nhi.gov

Visit the web site of the NHLBI for information on the cholesterol-triglyceride heart disease connection and for advice on how you can effectively manage your cholesterol and triglyceride blood levels with diet, exercise or medication. Try out the diet tool, quiz yourself on cholesterol and test your heart disease IQ.

American Diabetes Association (ADA)

http://www.diabetes.org/about-diabetes.jsp

The non-profit ADA offers a site full of helpful information and tools.

You’ll find self-tests on risks, along with the latest on diagnosis, treatments, nutrition and exercise.

Check out the MyFoodAdvisor calorie and carbohydrate counting tool and the

Nutrition & Recipes Guides to food labels and eating out.

Joslin Diabetes Center

http://www.joslin.org

Just diagnosed with diabetes? This helpful web site from Harvard Medical School’s Joslin Diabetes Center offer a comprehensive beginner’s guide to understanding diabetes and all of its health repercussions, a glossary and an extensive library of articles that tackles every aspect of the disease and its prevention and treatment.

The All-Natural Diabetes Cookbook by Jackie Newgent, RD, American Diabetes Association, 2007, $12.89 (paperback)

Dietitian Jackie Newgent shows how to use sneaky fat- and cholesterol-cutting tricks to keep foods tasty and healthful. Her flavorful recipes will be a breath of fresh air to diners with diabetes who are tired of bland meals. Includes tips and trivia to make sticking to a healthy diet fun.

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA)

http://www.aafa.org

The web site of the AAFA offers a multimedia asthma library of symptoms, treatments and news on video. There’s also an “Ask the Allergist” tool, a glossary of asthma terms and prevention advice.

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/

Visit the web site of the NHLBI for a comprehensive look at asthma prevention and treatment including how to live well with the disease.

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) http://www.aaaai.org/patients.stm

Visit the AAAAI website for pollen and mold counts in your area and news on the latest asthma research.

American Lung Association (ALA)

http://www.lungusa.org

Peruse asthma treatment options, news and procedures at this helpful site.

The Allergy and Asthma Cure:

A Complete 8-Step Nutritional Program, by Fred Pescatore, MD, Wiley, 2006, $10.85 (U.S.) (paperback)

Can nutritional fixes help ease allergies and asthma?

Author-doctor Fred Pescatore thinks so. His book examines the underlying causes of allergies and asthma, from food to the environment. He lays out a plan that uses alternative and traditional medicine and treatments to relieve asthma symptoms.

The Asthma Sourcebook, by Frances V. Adams, MD, McGraw-Hill, 2006, $13.56 (paperback)

Perfect for new asthma sufferers or those who want to review the basics of what causes asthma, how it is diagnosed and treated and the best ways to manage the disease. Also offers anatomical diagrams, resources and a glossary of terms.

The content of this brief is prepared in accordance with the highest standards of journalistic accuracy. Readers are cautioned, however, not to use brief information as a substitute for regular professional health care.

National Sleep Foundation (NSF)

http://www.sleepfoundation.org

Teaching the life-and-death importance of a good night’s sleep is the goal of the NSF site, which has interactive tools, quizzes and information for those in search of sleep.

Learn the importance of sleep hygiene and how to determine whether you have a sleep disorder. An “Ask the Sleep Expert” section offers advice on such topics as insomnia, pain and sleep and depression.

American Sleep Association (ASA)

http://www.sleepassociation.org

The web site of this association of physicians and scientists provides basic information on sleep and sleep disorders, from insomnia to apnea and restless leg syndrome. Users can search for medical research and abstracts on sleep topics and find a sleep lab near them.

The Harvard Medical School Guide to a Good Night’s Sleep, by Lawrence Epstein, MD, McGraw-Hill, 2006, $10.85 (paperback)

Lawrence Epstein, a doctor and sleep expert at Harvard Medical School, offers a six-step program for overcoming sleep problems, from insomnia and snoring to restless leg syndrome and sleep apnea. Also covers how to turn your bedroom into a sleep-friendly environment and decide which sleep medication might be right for you.

Insomniac, by Gail Greene, University of California Press, 2008, $19.77 U.S.

Written by a chronic (and often cranky) insomniac, this book explores the causes of, and supposed cures for, insomnia, explores the latest science on sleep and discusses the many repercussions of sleep deprivation, from lowered creativity and sex drive to weight gain and memory loss.

USDA MyPyramid

http://www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/grains_tips.html

Go inside the food pyramid at this site from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) for helpful advice on how to determine healthy portion sizes and work them into your daily diet. Its interactive MyPyramid Tracker can help you choose the foods and amounts that are right for you. You’ll get advice on smart choices from every food group, how to balance food intake and physical activity and get the most nutrition out of your calories.

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/

Download the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2005, at this government site to get helpful information on deciphering food labels and choosing the most nutritious foods when you’re eating in or out. “Healthier You” information on the site helps you determine your Body Mass Index (BMI) and how many calories you need each day to maintain a healthy weight. A section of diets and worksheets helps you put your good intentions into action.

Medline Plus

http://nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus

Find information about eating right and healthy living in the medical encyclopedia section of this web site created by the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health. It provides helpful and easy-to-understand illustrated explanations of various heart-health ailments and how to combat them with lifestyle changes, including exercise, diet and medication.

MyRecipes.com/recipes/

http://www.myrecipes.com/recipes/

Looking for smart ways to eat healthy? This web site from Cooking Light, Southern Living and Health magazines is full of flavorful recipes.

The Nutrition Source

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource

This nutrition site run by the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health explores the latest science about healthful eating for adults. It offers clear tips for a healthy diet and dispels a few nutrition myths along the way. You’ll find out what you should eat from protein, fiber, fats and carbohydrates to fruits and vegetables – and why.

American Heart Association (AHA)

7272 Greenville Avenue

Dallas, TX 75231

(800) 242-8721

http://www.americanheart.org

The AHA offers print and online materials to help consumers reduce their risks of cardiovascular disease and stroke. Its web site offers advice on making nutritious food choices. A section of triglycerides explains lipid levels and how to lower them with diet, exercise, or medication.

Web MD

http://www.webmd.com

The Heart Health Center of this doctor-driven web site provides the latest headlines in heart health and blood pressure news as well as comprehensive explanations of how the heart works and information on how cholesterol and triglyceride levels impact heart health. With a glossary of terms and resource and community links.

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

http://www.nhlbi.nhi.gov

Visit the web site of the NHLBI for information on the cholesterol-triglyceride heart disease connection and for advice on how you can effectively manage your cholesterol and triglyceride blood levels with diet, exercise or medication. Try out the diet tool, quiz yourself on cholesterol and test your heart disease IQ.

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